Hey, there's not much to say. This is just my blog, things I like, things I think, things I feel.

This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald

I’ve read a couple of Fitzgerald’s books in my time. As in two. After school ruined the joy of The Great Gatsby by over analysing and a general lack of interest in The Beautiful and the Damned, I didn’t think too much about F. I mean, I know he writes great books about the twenties, rich people, and disillusionment but I never really connected fully with him. That is, until I read This Side of Paradise. Right off the bat the book caught me eye. I had seen a copy sitting in my sister’s room and Hemingway (probably because of A Moveable Feast) always makes me think of F. Not to mention the pretty name. (Side note: F. is really good at naming books. I mean, think about how catchy and pretty they all. You see a book with the title The Beautiful and the Damned  and you will pull that book off the shelf). And I was immediately excited because (having recently read A Separate Peace) the promise of war and fancy schools was on my mind. So I bought it and read it and enjoyed it.

And, as expected, the book is beautiful. F. has a great writing style that isn’t really prose but just reads wonderfully. though the general plot line isn’t hard to guess with the other books in F.’s collection, This Side of Paradise captivated me immensely. It is a bit repetitive with the peaks and valley’s of Amory’s love and listlessness, but smart. The kind of book you read when you want ideas and to think. Amory does name drop a little, but for much of the book he is just a student trying to find answers- which I connect to. He reads and learns and just tries to understand the world but keeps finding out that his way of thinking is wrong or not right for him or just becomes to broken down to think anymore.

There is a seamless way F. weaves poetry into the story, adding in lines here and there to show Amory’s (the main character) emotions. At one part the story changes into a play. While weird at first, it made complete sense for the format to change as well as giving air to the reading. We’ve all had moments where lines just blur together and F.’s ease-filled breaks keep that from happening.

 Overall the book is very good. The writing is amazing, I had never read a book that changes formats like it. It holds the same symbolism as The Great Gatsby but was more relatable. Nick never seemed as easy to understand to me, but Amory was. It was a great read written but an amazing author

Reblogged from 5000letters  9,485 notes

When they ask me about my future wife, I always tell them that her eyes are the only Christmas lights that deserve to be seen all year long. I tell them that she has a walk that can make an atheist believe in God just long enough to say, ‘God damn’. I tell them that if my alarm clock sounded like her voice, my snooze button would collect dust. I tell them that if she came in a bottle, I would drink her until my vision is blurry and my friends take away my keys. I tell them that if she was a book, I would memorize her table of contents. I would read her, cover to cover, hoping to find typos, just so we could both have something to work on, because aren’t we all unfinished? By Rudy Francisco, A Lot Like You (via 5000letters)

The Nick Adams Stories by Ernest Hemingway

I’ve read four Hemingway’s before and I’ve been pretty iffy about the guy. A Moveable Feast  and The Old and the Sea were amazing to me- perfect and well written. But The Sun Also Rises and A Farewell to Arms I swallowed like a lump in my throat- pushing, forcing, trying to shove the literature down my esophagus. So a Hemingway fan I have never really been. But I bough The Nick Adams Stories anyway. They are a collection of short stories all including the recurring character: Nick Adams. Some of the stories were simple in the best way. The classic minimalist voice of Hemingway bluntly telling a story without losing any symbolism. But maybe I just don’t have the strength to have too much Ernest because by the end of it, I was counting down pages.

My sister once told me something about Hemingway’s voice being lost on me and I’m beginning to think she is right. While with Salinger I watch page numbers to make sure they aren’t disappearing, it is a chore to push through one of H.’s novels. Nick Adams is a very interesting character with many adventures I found compelling and worth rereading but overall it was another failed attempt to get myself invested in H.

I especially think that the book would be immensely more interesting to read if I knew more about H. Nick Adams seems to be a character the H. used to work through his own issues without having to confront himself. I, as formerly implied, have very little knowledge about the late author but the blurb said that Adams tales closely mimicked H.’s, all of that was, sadly, lost on me.

So overall the stories were far from a waste of time. It is always important to study those great authors especial if you feel you can get something out of it. H. is credited with changing literature as it was known and you can’t just ignore someone like that. The book itself was interesting (which I haven’t given it enough credit for) especially Adam’s young life. While I don’t think I’ll ever return to the book as a whole, there are pieces I found to be very compelling

six word poem 7/8/14

atonguewithbutsixwords:

Prompt: “We dated, it ended, it didn’t work.  I can’t let go of it though, I won’t.  I’m still in love, and I’ll love them to my grave.  I’m not moving on, I just refuse to.  It was too right and so I’ll stay emotionally wrapped within it.  Others will scoff and ridicule, but I’ll still have half of this relationship.”

The sinking
ship IS 
my lifeboat. 

Reblogged from humansofnewyork  12,528 notes
humansofnewyork:

"We’re getting divorced because we love each other, and we both realize that we don’t have enough of what the other needs. When we decided to get divorced, I wrote a note with all the things I loved about her, and gave it to her. She got very emotional and started crying. Then three days later, she wrote me a similar note. But here’s the thing—- she wrote it on the back of a recycled piece of paper. She wrote it on the back of an advertisement or something. So I called her out on it. And she said: ‘I knew you were going to bring that up. If you cared, you wouldn’t mind what it was written on.’ And I said: ‘Well, if you cared, you’d have gotten a fresh piece of paper.’"

humansofnewyork:

"We’re getting divorced because we love each other, and we both realize that we don’t have enough of what the other needs. When we decided to get divorced, I wrote a note with all the things I loved about her, and gave it to her. She got very emotional and started crying. Then three days later, she wrote me a similar note. But here’s the thing—- she wrote it on the back of a recycled piece of paper. She wrote it on the back of an advertisement or something. So I called her out on it. And she said: ‘I knew you were going to bring that up. If you cared, you wouldn’t mind what it was written on.’ And I said: ‘Well, if you cared, you’d have gotten a fresh piece of paper.’"